§ 38.2-1401

Definitions

As used in this chapter:

“Admitted assets” means, for purposes of the limitations and standards imposed by Articles 1 and 2 of this chapter, the amount thereof as permitted to be reported on the statutory financial statement of the insurer most recently required to be filed with the Commission pursuant to §§ 38.2-1300 and 38.2-1301 or other similar provisions within this title, but excluding the assets allocated to separate accounts pursuant to Article 3 (§ 38.2-1443 et seq.) of this chapter.”Business entity” means a corporation, association, partnership, joint venture, trust, church, or religious body.”Cap” means an agreement obligating the seller to make payments to the buyer, with each payment based on the amount by which a reference price or level or the performance or value of one or more underlying interests exceeds a predetermined number, sometimes called the strike rate or strike price.”Category 1 investment” means any investment complying with Article 1 (§ 38.2-1400 et seq.) and either Article 2 (§ 38.2-1412 et seq.) or 3 (§ 38.2-1443 et seq.), or both Articles 2 and 3, of this chapter.”Category 2 investment” means any investment complying with Article 1, but with neither Article 2 nor Article 3, of this chapter.”Claimants” means any owners, beneficiaries, assignees, certificate holders, or third-party beneficiaries of any insurance benefit or right arising out of and within the coverage of an insurance policy, annuity contract, benefit contract, or subscription contract.”Collar” means an agreement to receive payments as the buyer of an option, cap, or floor and to make payments as the seller of a different option, cap, or floor.”Counterparty exposure amount” means the amount of credit risk attributable to an over-the-counter derivative instrument, which amount of credit risk is equal to (i) the market value of the over-the-counter derivative instrument if the liquidation of the derivative instrument would result in a final cash payment to the insurer or (ii) zero if the liquidation of the derivative instrument would not result in a final cash payment to the insurer. However, if an over-the-counter derivative instrument is entered into under a written master agreement that provides for netting of payments owed by the respective parties, and the domicile of the counterparty is either within the United States or, if not within the United States, within a foreign jurisdiction listed in the Purposes and Procedures Manual of the Securities Valuation Office as eligible for netting, the amount of credit risk attributable to the over-the-counter derivative instrument shall be the greater of zero or the net sum of (a) the market value of the over-the-counter derivative instruments entered into under the agreement, the liquidation of which would result in a final cash payment to the insurer, and (b) the market value of the over-the-counter derivative instruments entered into under the agreement, the liquidation of which would result in a final cash payment by the insurer to the business entity. With respect to open transactions, the market value of the over-the-counter derivative instrument shall be determined at the end of the most recent quarter of the insurer’s fiscal year and shall be reduced by the market value of acceptable collateral held by the insurer or placed in escrow by one or both parties.”Date of investment” means the date on which funds are disbursed for an investment.”Derivative instrument” means an agreement, instrument, or a series or combination thereof (i) to make or take delivery of, or assume or relinquish, a specified amount of one or more underlying interests or to make a cash settlement in lieu thereof or (ii) that has a price, performance, value, or cash flow based primarily upon the actual or expected price, level, performance, value, or cash flow of one or more underlying interests. Derivative instruments include options, warrants used in a hedging transaction and not attached to another financial instrument, caps, floors, collars, swaps, forwards, futures, and any other agreements, options, or instruments substantially similar thereto or any series or combination thereof and any agreements or instruments permitted under rules adopted under § 38.2-1428.”Derivative transaction” means a transaction involving the use of one or more derivative instruments.”Domestic governmental entity” means the United States, any state, or any municipality or district in any such state, or any political subdivision, civil division, agency or instrumentality of one or more of the foregoing.”Fair market value” means the price that property will bring when (i) offered for sale by one who desires, but who is not obligated, to sell it; (ii) bought by one who is under no necessity of having it; and (iii) sufficient time has elapsed to allow interested buyers the opportunity to become informed of the offer for sale.”Fixed charges” means actual interest incurred in each year on funded and unfunded debt, excluding interest on bank deposit accounts, and annual apportionment of debt discount or premium. Where interest is partially or entirely contingent upon earnings, “fixed charges” includes contingent interest payments.”Floor” means an agreement obligating the seller to make payments to the buyer in which each payment is based on the amount by which a predetermined number, sometimes called the floor rate or price, exceeds a reference price, a level, or the performance or value of one or more underlying interests.”Forward” means an agreement, other than a future, to make or take delivery of, or effect a cash settlement based on the actual or expected price, level, performance or value of, one or more underlying interests.”Future” means an agreement, traded on a qualified exchange or qualified foreign exchange, to make or take delivery of, or effect a cash settlement based on the actual or expected price, level, performance or value of, one or more underlying interests and includes an insurance future.

“Hedging transaction” means:

1. A derivative transaction that is entered into and maintained to reduce:

a. The risk of a change in the value, yield, price, cash flow, or quantity of assets or liabilities that the insurer has acquired or incurred or anticipates acquiring or incurring; or

b. The currency exchange rate risk or the degree of exposure as to assets or liabilities that the insurer has acquired or incurred or anticipates acquiring or incurring; or

2. Any other derivative transaction specified as constituting a hedging transaction in rules adopted pursuant to § 38.2-1428.

High grade obligations” means obligations which (i) are rated one or two by the Securities Valuation Office of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners or (ii) if not rated by the Securities Valuation Office, are rated in an equivalent grade by a national rating agency recognized by the Commission.”Insurance future” means a future relating to an index or pool that is based on insurance-related items.”Insurance futures option” means an option on an insurance future.”Insurer” means a company licensed pursuant to Chapter 10 (§ 38.2-1000 et seq.), 11 (§ 38.2-1100 et seq.), 12 (§ 38.2-1200 et seq.), 25 (§ 38.2-2500 et seq.), 26 (§ 38.2-2600 et seq.), 38 (§ 38.2-3800 et seq.), 39 (§ 38.2-3900 et seq.), 40 (§ 38.2-4000 et seq.), 41 (§ 38.2-4100 et seq.), 42 (§ 38.2-4200 et seq.), 43 (§ 38.2-4300 et seq.), 45 (§ 38.2-4500 et seq.), 46 (§ 38.2-4600 et seq.), 51 (§ 38.2-5100 et seq.), or 61 (§ 38.2-6100 et seq.) of this title.”Life insurer” means any insurer authorized to transact life insurance or to grant annuities as defined in §§ 38.2-102 through 38.2-107 or authorized pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 38, 39, 40 or 41, or any other chapter of this title, to provide any one of the following contractual benefits in any form: death benefits, endowment benefits, annuity benefits or monument or tombstone benefits.”Lower grade obligations” means obligations which (i) are rated four, five, or six by the Securities Valuation Office of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners or (ii) if not rated by the Securities Valuation Office, are rated in an equivalent grade by a national rating agency recognized by the Commission.”Medium grade obligations” means obligations which (i) are rated three by the Securities Valuation Office of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners or (ii) if not rated by the Securities Valuation office, are rated in an equivalent grade by a national rating agency recognized by the Commission.”Minimum capital and surplus” means the minimum surplus to policyholders, or minimum net worth, a particular insurer must have to obtain and maintain its license to transact business in this Commonwealth pursuant to the applicable provisions of this title. In no case shall an insurer’s minimum capital and surplus be less than zero.”Net earnings available for fixed charges” means income minus operating expenses, maintenance expenses, taxes other than income taxes, depreciation, and depletion. Extraordinary nonrecurring income and expense items are excluded from the calculation of “net earnings available for fixed charges.”"Obligation” means a bond, debenture, note or other evidence of indebtedness.”Option” means an agreement giving the buyer the right to buy or receive, sell or deliver, enter into, extend, terminate, or effect a cash settlement based on the actual or expected price, level, performance, or value of one or more underlying interests. “Option” includes an insurance futures option.”Over-the-counter derivative instrument” means a derivative instrument that is entered into with a business entity other than through a qualified exchange or qualified foreign exchange or that is cleared other than through a qualified clearinghouse.”Potential exposure” means the amount determined in accordance with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners Annual Statement Instructions.”Prohibited investment” means any investment prohibited by § 38.2-1407.”Qualified clearinghouse” means a clearinghouse for, and that is subject to the rules of, a qualified exchange or a qualified foreign exchange, which clearinghouse provides clearing services, including acting as a counterparty to each of the parties to a transaction such that the parties no longer have credit risk as to each other.”Qualified exchange” means:

1. A securities exchange registered as a national securities exchange, or a securities market regulated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. § 78a et seq.), as amended;

2. A board of trade or commodities exchange designated as a contract market by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission or any successor thereof;

3. Private Offerings, Resales and Trading through Automated Linkages (PORTAL);

4. A designated offshore securities market as defined in Securities Exchange Commission Regulation S, 17 C.F.R. Part 230, as amended; or

5. A qualified foreign exchange.

Qualified foreign exchange” means a foreign exchange, board of trade, or contract market located outside the United States:

1. That has received regulatory comparability relief under Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) Rule 30.10 (as set forth in Appendix C to Part 30 of the CFTC’s regulations at 17 C.F.R. Part 30);

2. That is, or whose members are, subject to the jurisdiction of a foreign futures authority that has received regulatory comparability relief under CFTC Rule 30.10 (as set forth in Appendix C to Part 30 of the CFTC’s regulations at 17 C.F.R. Part 30) as to futures transactions in the jurisdiction where the exchange, board of trade, or contract market is located; or

3. Upon which foreign stock index futures contracts are listed that are the subject of no-action relief issued by the CFTC’s Office of General Counsel, provided that an exchange, board of trade, or contract market that qualifies as a “qualified foreign exchange” only under this subsection shall only be a “qualified foreign exchange” as to foreign stock index futures contracts that are the subject of no-action relief.

Replication transaction” means a derivative transaction that is intended to replicate the performance of one or more assets that an insurer is authorized to acquire under this chapter. A derivative transaction that is entered into as a hedging transaction shall not be considered a replication transaction.”Reserve liabilities” means those liabilities which are required to be established by an insurer for all of its outstanding insurance policies, annuity contracts, benefit contracts and subscription contracts, in accordance with this title, as amended or as hereafter amended.”Statement value” means the amount determined in accordance with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners Annual Statement Instructions.”Swap” means an agreement to exchange or to net payments at one or more times based on the actual or expected price, level, performance, or value of one or more underlying interests.”Underlying interest” means the assets, liabilities, or other interests, or a combination thereof, underlying a derivative instrument, such as any one or more securities, currencies, rates, indices, commodities, or derivative instruments.”Warrant” means an instrument that gives the holder the right to purchase an underlying financial instrument at a given price and time or at a series of prices and times outlined in the warrant agreement. Warrants may be issued alone or in connection with the sale of other securities.”Wrap-around mortgage” means a loan made by an insurer to a borrower, secured by a mortgage or deed of trust on real property encumbered by a first mortgage or first deed of trust, where the total amount of the obligation of the borrower to the insurer under the loan is not less than the sum of (i) the principal amount initially disbursed by the insurer on account of the loan and (ii) the unpaid principal balance of the obligation secured by the preexisting mortgage or deed of trust.

History

1983, c. 457, § 38.1-217.2; 1986, c. 562; 1992, c. 588; 1994, c. 503; 1998, c. 42; 2004, c. 668; 2008, c. 216; 2011, c. 198.

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